Modern Languages

Staffing

Mr J Wilson (Head of Modern Languages)
Mrs S Chadwick (Second in Department)
Mrs C Dawson (Teacher of French and German)
Mrs J Harrington (Teacher of French and German)
Mrs L Ried (Teacher of French and German)
Mrs D Wilson (Teacher of French)

 

Department Overview

We believe in the importance and relevance of languages to the lives and future careers of our students. We aim to make language learning fun, stimulating and inspiring, with pupils making swift progress in Year 7 learning two languages simultaneously. Lessons are taught in an interactive, communicative style, and pupils are encouraged to enjoy conversing in the language and to aim to use the language at all times throughout each lesson. We are very fortunate to have two, purpose-built classrooms, each equipped with touch screen interactive whiteboards and a computer for each child.

KS3 Summary of Study

Why do we study Modern Languages?
We believe in the importance and relevance of languages to the lives and future careers of our students.  In Key Stage 3, we aim to provide our pupils with language-learning skills, which will stay with them for life.  We hope that pupils gain the knowledge and skills that give them the confidence and curiosity to continue their language study to GCSE and beyond, or the ability to return to it in the future.
How will I learn about Modern Languages over the programme of study?
We aim to enthuse students to enjoy languages through varied and engaging teaching and resources.  We hope to foster inquisitive linguists, thirsty to learn about the world around them.
Our Key Stage 3 curriculum covers a variety of topic areas, enabling students to give and justify opinions about their personal experiences.  It provides opportunities to expand the students’ horizons and ambitions by developing new ways of thinking and raising cultural awareness of the countries in which the target language is spoken.
In Year 7, pupils learn two languages simultaneously. Lessons are taught in an interactive, communicative style, and pupils are encouraged to enjoy conversing in the target language.
What enrichment opportunities are there?
Languages clinic is open to all pupils one lunchtime a week as a drop in session to support pupils.  Colleagues also run stretch and extend sessions, which target specific pupils who benefit from some extra attention.
Our foreign film club appeals to a range of ages.  A broad selection of titles enthuses our budding cinephiles.
The department runs an annual trip to Berlin in conjunction with the History department.  This popular cross-curricular excursion is offered to Year 9 pupils.
We have long-standing links with partner schools in Morlaix, Brittany and Geretsried, Bavaria.  Successful languages exchanges have taken place over the last twenty years.  Pupils from Years 9 are eligible to take part.
How does this link to my progression onto GCSE and beyond?
Pupils study languages for three periods per week for both French and German in Year 7 and Year 8. At the end of Year 8, pupils choose either to continue with both languages in Year 9, or to follow just one language. Pupils may then continue with one or both languages to GCSE.
Pupils have the opportunity to study French and German at A-Level.  Pupils frequently study both languages.  Many of our pupils continue their language studies at university.
Key Information:
Broad topics that will be covered:
Family, School, Local Area, Holidays, Health, Festivals, the Media, Hobbies
Assessment methods:
Listening, Reading, Speaking, Writing
Subject lead
Mr J Wilson
What resources do I have available to help me in this subject?
KS3 French course: Studio
KS3 German course: Stimmt!
AQA Kerboodle

KS4 Summary of Study

Why study French?
A GCSE in French is a valued qualification, which appeals to both employers and universities alike.  According to The CBI’s 2018 Education and Skills Annual Report, “Learning a foreign language can greatly benefit young people by providing exposure to other cultures, fostering pupils’ curiosity and deepening their understanding of the world. There is much to be gained from being able to express thoughts in another language, including ‘the language of business’.
The influential report, which surveyed businesses across all sizes, regions and sectors, also revealed that the major European language most in demand among UK firms was French.
We firmly believe that a language GCSE is not just a useful qualification but is also a key skill for life. The modern language department looks forward to broadening the students’ horizons and developing their communication skills!
Features of the course:
Lessons are taught in an interactive, communicative style, with students being encouraged to enjoy conversing in French.  The GCSE course builds on what has been learned in Key Stage 3 by developing pupils’ vocabulary, and allowing them to communicate with a wider range of complex structures.
In our blended curriculum, classroom teaching is supported by online resources, which are particularly useful for developing reading and listening skills.  Pupils will study language from a wide variety of sources, including songs and poems, and websites.
Enrichment:
In Year 10 students will have the opportunity to take part in our well-established exchange programme to Brittany. The trip offers two fun weeks with an exchange partner both in Penrith and in Morlaix.
What opportunities for progression does it offer?
The course prepares students well for A-Level study and beyond.
Key information:
GCSE French
Topics for Study:
Identity and culture
Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Current and future study and employment
Assessment summary
End of course examinations in reading, listening, writing and speaking (25% each)
Exam Board
AQA
Subject lead contact details:
Mr J Wilson
JWilson@qegs.cumbria.sch.uk
Why study German?
A GCSE in German is a valued qualification, which appeals to both employers and universities alike.  According to The CBI’s 2018 Education and Skills Annual Report, “Learning a foreign language can greatly benefit young people by providing exposure to other cultures, fostering pupils’ curiosity and deepening their understanding of the world. There is much to be gained from being able to express thoughts in another language, including ‘the language of business’.
The influential report, which surveyed businesses across all sizes, regions and sectors, also revealed that the second major European language most in demand among UK firms was German.
We firmly believe that a language GCSE is not just a useful qualification but is also a key skill for life. The modern language department looks forward to broadening the students’ horizons and developing their communication skills!
Features of the course:
Lessons are taught in an interactive, communicative style, with students being encouraged to enjoy conversing in French.  The GCSE course builds on what has been learned in Key Stage 3 by developing pupils’ vocabulary, and allowing them to communicate with a wider range of complex structures.
In our blended curriculum, classroom teaching is supported by online resources, which are particularly useful for developing reading and listening skills.  Pupils will study language from a wide variety of sources, including songs and poems, and websites.
Enrichment:
In Year 10 students will have the opportunity to take part in our well-established exchange programme to Geretsried. The trip offers two fun weeks with an exchange partner both in Penrith and in Bavaria.
What opportunities for progression does it offer?
The course prepares students well for A-Level study and beyond.
Key information:
GCSE German
Topics for Study:
Identity and culture
Local, national, international and global areas of interest
Current and future study and employment
Assessment summary
End of course examinations in reading, listening, writing and speaking (25% each)
Exam Board
AQA
Subject lead contact details:
Mr J Wilson
JWilson@qegs.cumbria.sch.uk

 

KS5 Summary of Study

Why study French?
Universities are keen to offer places to applicants with a language at A-Level as it demonstrates that you possess skills and attributes such as problem-solving, adaptability, a global mind-set, communicating with different audiences and developing an analytical mind.  Graduates with language skills are definitely more employable and earn an average of 8% – 20% more.
You can enhance your career prospects in many fields by having a language capability alongside other specialist subjects.  As a tool for communication, a language at A-Level complements a wide range of sciences and humanities.
An A-Level in French will enable you to apply for any ab initio language course at university. It could be your door to Mandarin, Spanish, Arabic or many other exciting or unusual languages.
What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?
You will study grammar in more depth at A-Level and learn how to express yourself much more fluently with a high level of complexity and accuracy.
Some of the topics at A-Level are an extension to those studied at GCSE. However whereas GCSE focuses on your personal experiences, the A-Level course encourages the study of topics in the wider context of French society. For example, when at GCSE you might be asked “How do you get on with your siblings?” at A-Level you might discuss “Is there such a thing as a typical French ‘family’?”
Features of the course:
We will study technological and social change, and look at diversity and multiculturalism and the benefits and issues they bring. You will study highlights of French-speaking artistic culture, including art, music, architecture and cinema. You will learn about political engagement, how the political landscapes of France were formed and who wields political power in the French-speaking world.
You will explore the influence of the past on present-day French-speaking communities. Throughout your studies, you will learn the language in the context of French-speaking countries and the issues and influences which have shaped them.
You will study texts and film and have the opportunity to carry out independent research on an area of your choice.
Key information:
Topics for Study: Social issues and trends, political and artistic culture, grammar, works:
literary texts and films.
Assessment summary Paper 1: Listening, reading and writing, written examination 2 hours
30 minutes (50%)
Paper 2: Writing, written examination 2 hours (20%)
Paper 3: Speaking, oral exam 21-23 minutes (including 5 minutes
preparation time (30%)
Entry requirements Grade 6 or above in GCSE French
Exam Board AQA
Subject lead contact details: Mr Wilson, Head of Modern Languages;
JWilson@qegs.cumbria.sch.uk

 

Why study German?
Universities are keen to offer places to applicants with a language at A-Level as it demonstrates that you possess skills and attributes such as problem-solving, adaptability, a global mind-set, communicating with different audiences and developing an analytical mind.  Graduates with language skills are definitely more employable and earn an average of 8% – 20% more.
You can enhance your career prospects in many fields by having a language capability alongside other specialist subjects.  As a tool for communication, a language at A-Level complements a wide range of sciences and humanities.
An A-Level in German will enable you to apply for any ab initio language course at university. It could be your door to Mandarin, Spanish, Arabic or many other exciting or unusual languages.
What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?
You will study grammar in more depth at A-Level and learn how to express yourself much more fluently with a high level of complexity and accuracy.
Some of the topics at A-Level are an extension to those studied at GCSE. However whereas GCSE focuses on your personal experiences, the A-Level course encourages the study of topics in the wider context of German-speaking society. For example, when at GCSE you might be asked, “What did you do last Christmas?” at A-Level you might discuss, “Why are festivals like Christmas important in Germany?”
Features of the course:
We will study social change, diversity, multiculturalism and the benefits and issues they bring. You will study highlights of German-speaking artistic culture, including art, music, architecture and cinema. You will learn about political engagement, how the political landscapes of German were formed by events such as the fall of the Berlin Wall, and the role of the EU from the perspective of German speakers.
You will explore the influence of the past on present-day German-speaking communities. Throughout your studies, you will learn the language in the context of German-speaking countries and the issues and influences which have shaped them.
You will study texts and film and have the opportunity to carry out independent research on an area of your choice.
Key information:
Topics for Study: Social issues and trends, political and artistic culture, grammar, works:
literary texts and films.
Assessment summary Paper 1: Listening, reading and writing, written examination 2 hours
30 minutes (50%)
Paper 2: Writing, written examination 2 hours (20%)
Paper 3: Speaking, oral exam 21-23 minutes (including 5 minutes
preparation time (30%)
Entry requirements Grade 6 or above in GCSE German
Exam Board AQA
Subject lead contact details: Mr Wilson, Head of Modern Languages;
JWilson@qegs.cumbria.sch.uk

Careers

In recent years sixth-form pupils have participated in lectures and seminars run by Lancaster University to support their studies in school.
Sixth-form pupils are regularly employed as study-buddies to work with younger pupils.  The pupils help to organize work and practise speaking.

 

Extra-Curricular

Languages clinic is open to all pupils one lunchtime a week as a drop in session to support pupils.  Colleagues also run stretch and extend sessions, which target specific pupils who benefit from some extra attention.
Our foreign film club appeals to a range of ages.  A broad selection of titles enthuses our budding cinephiles.
The department runs an annual trip to Berlin in conjunction with the History department.  This popular cross-curricular excursion has been running successfully for a number of years.
We have long-standing links with partner schools in Morlaix, Brittany and Geretsried, Bavaria.  Successful languages exchanges have taken place over the last twenty years.  Pupils from Years 12, 10 and 9 have taken part.
In collaboration with other schools in the Carlisle Consortium, Year 13 pupils recently took part in a seminar day to aid their French film study.
In recent years, Key Stage 3 pupils have enjoyed an international music competition and a viewing of a French theatre production.
International Day of Languages is marked each year with a range of activities intended to promote both language learning, and the awareness of different cultures within our school community.  Highlights have included treasure hunts, a special menu in the school canteen, and taster lessons delivered by pupils who speak another language.