Music

Staffing

Mr D R Roberts MMus PGCE – Head of Music
Mr D Stone BA(Hons) PGCE – Teacher of Music
Mr R Saudek BA(Hons) LRAM – Teacher of Piano
Mrs B Gilbertson – Teacher of Strings, Voice and Piano
Miss C Jackson GRNCM LGSMD (MT) – Teacher of Voice
Mr A Roze – Teacher of Guitar
Mr I Butterworth CTABRSM – Teacher of Brass
Mr R Rigby – Teacher of Percussion
Mr G Linsey – Teacher of Single Reed Woodwind
Mr A McQuiston BMus Perf – Teacher of Cello
Mrs C Johnson – Teacher of Voice

Department Overview

Music at Queen Elizabeth Grammar School perpetuates a tradition of exceptional musical ability and thrives within the school. Pupils of all backgrounds, having studied music prior to their education here or not, are encouraged to develop their understanding of a wide variety of music in three main ways – analysing, performance and creating. Many pupils choose to receive individual singing/instrumental lessons to broaden their musical skill, with many pupils placing in groups like the National Youth Orchestra and National Youth Choir.  A high percentage of pupils also contribute in some way to the musical life of the school.
Daily rehearsals allow pupils to develop their sense of musicianship and responsibility as an individual to their fellow peers. These rehearsals culminate in regular End of Term Services, concerts, trips, performances outside of school, the Penrith School’s Music Association Christmas Concerts, tours abroad, and the department’s annual school production.
The Music Department has use of a large teaching room at the top of the school for timetabled lessons, whilst boasting five equipped practice rooms for peripatetic teaching and personal practice. We have use of the School Hall for our concerts and productions, which is well equipped with stage, setting and a Kawai Grand Piano. We also have use of the Atrium of the Colin Burnie building for other musical events.
For GCSE and A Level pupils we have a library of musical scores, reference books and other literature on music, whilst having computer-notating facilities to aid composition.

Key Stage 3

We approach these years by encouraging pupils to develop their musicianship in three main ways – listening (analysing), performing (producing) and composing (creating). As part of finding out about each pupil, pupils receive a baseline assessment test when they arrive at school, which allows us to understand their previous musical training better.
Listening:
Pupils will have the opportunity to listen to, watch, experience and analyse a range of musical styles from music of the Western Canon of classical music right through to music from the far reaches of the world.
Performing:
Pupils will have the opportunity to perform a range of musical styles from music of the Western Canon of classical music right through to music from the far reaches of the world using their voices, percussive and pitched instruments.
Composing:
Pupils will be given the tools to create their own music within a framework of different genres of musical styles from music of the Western Canon of classical music right through to music from the far reaches of the world.
Scheme of Work: Year 7
Term
Unit of Work
Skills
Assessment/Feedback
Autumn 1
Baseline Assessment
Night and Day
Assessment of prior skills.
Pupils learn what intrinsically makes a sound musical, focusing on using graphic score notation to realise their group performances/compositions.
Pupils are given a starting grade.
Formative assessment in lesson.
Written feedback on a progress sheet with a video evidencing monitor.
Autumn 2
Stomp
Pupils begin the process of learning how to write rhythmical patters and ideas down in conventional musical notation, developing their performance skills.
Formative assessment in lesson.
Written feedback on a progress sheet with a video evidencing monitor.
Spring 1
Form and Structure
Having the knowledge to now write out musical ideas, pupils begin analysing how music is ordered to compose coherent and satisfying musical pieces.
Formative assessment in lesson.
Written feedback on a progress sheet with a video evidencing monitor.
Spring 2
Folk Music
Using their singing voices, pupils are encouraged to rehearse and refine performances of traditional Folk Music. This is used as a way to introduce the idea of melody and contour.
Formative assessment in lesson.
Written feedback on a progress sheet with a video evidencing monitor.
Summer 1
Instruments of the Orchestra
This unit helps pupils develop their aural and critical thinking abilities by recognising the different timbres of each group of families within the orchestra.
Formative assessment in lesson.
Written feedback on a progress sheet with a video evidencing monitor.
Summer 2
Gamelan
Pupils combine their ability to write rhythms down with conventional pitch notation, focusing on the musical staff, whilst learning about the traditions of Indonesian music.
Formative assessment in lesson.
Written feedback on a progress sheet with a video evidencing monitor.
Scheme of Work: Year 8
Term
Unit of Work
Skills
Assessment/Feedback
Autumn 1
Ladders
This is an introduction to the many different musical scales which are used in music and what effect each of them have. Pupils will study pentatonic, chromatic and diatonic scales.
Formative assessment in lesson.
Written feedback on a progress sheet with a video evidencing monitor.
Spring 1
Offbeat
Pupils use melody and chord sequences to think about syncopation in many musical textures.
Formative assessment in lesson.
Written feedback on a progress sheet with a video evidencing monitor.
Summer 1
Variations
Pupils learn a set of musical devices to vary existing compositions. Pupils learn how composers vary their music.
Formative assessment in lesson.
Written feedback on a progress sheet with a video evidencing monitor.
Scheme of Work: Year 9
Term
Unit of Work
Skills
Assessment/Feedback
Autumn 1
Film Music
This unit teaches pupils to play familiar music, like the James Bond theme, whilst working on their own understanding of the word Leitmotif. Pupils design and arrange their own performance to fit a trailer
.
Formative assessment in lesson.
Written feedback on a progress sheet with a video evidencing monitor.
Spring 1
Rock and Roll
Pupils learn about chords and bass lines, recreating some of the iconic pieces of this period.
Formative assessment in lesson.
Written feedback on a progress sheet with a video evidencing monitor.
Summer 1
Minimalism
In preparation for GCSE music, this unit brings together melody, pitch, form and structure to reinforce pupil understanding. Pupils look at how different motifs can be repeated/layered to give an over-arching structure
Formative assessment in lesson.
Written feedback on a progress sheet with a video evidencing
monitor.

 

Key Stage 4

Why Study GCSE Music?
In GCSE music, pupils are encouraged to develop their analysing, performing and composing abilities through the study of a wide range of music. This includes listening to, analysing and comparing different pieces of music from different periods of music, performing music on their voice or instrument to ABRSM Grade 5 standard and composing their own music on computer-notating software (Sibelius 8). A competent level of performing is required as a pre-requisite to the course as well as a deep passion for the subject.
Features of the Edexcel GCSE Music Course
There are three ways in which this subject is assessed – a 1 hour and 45 minute listening exam on the Set Works we will study and some unfamiliar music, a pair of performances (solo and ensemble) and a pair of compositions (free and to a set brief). The performances and compositions are examined as coursework and makes up 60% of the marks for the course. The listening paper makes up the remaining 40%.
Enrichment
There is always the opportunity to attend the daily rehearsals within the music department and to take a leading role in the concerts, End of Term Services, trips, and annual musical production. GCSE pupils are encouraged to lead and organise groups of their own or to direct some of the already established ensembles.
The music rooms are always open for pupils to use to be creative, practise or study.
The musical tour gives pupils the opportunity to experience life as a freelance musician.
As other musical groups tour the country, pupils attend concerts and lectures with them as a way to observe their musical life and styles.
What opportunities for progression does this offer?
Personal autonomy, discipline, problem solving, compromise, creativity, creative thinking, observational skills, ability to study and work independently, organisation, scientific analysis, ability to react and respond to a range of differences.
Scheme of Work: KS4 Curriculum – Edexcel GCSE Music
Year one:
Autumn 1
Autumn 2
Introduction to the GCSE course (3 weeks):
  • Build on knowledge and experience at KS3
  • Consolidate basic musical vocabulary and knowledge
  • Study exemplar performances and compositions
  • Look at the assessment criteria for the coursework tasks.
Instrumental Music 1700–1820 set works (4 weeks):
J.S. Bach: 3rd Movement from Brandenburg Concerto no.5 in D major
L. van Beethoven: 1st Movement from Piano Sonata no.8 in C minor ‘Pathétique’
  • Explore these pieces by using the students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language to make critical judgements about the music. Once each piece has been studied, comparative and evaluative skills can be practised between the two.
  • The set works show the link between Baroque instrumental music and dance genres. They also, and introduce fugue, and also the 19th-century Romantic sensibility in music and its application to sonata form.
Preparation for the performance component is ongoing.
Instrumental Music 1700–1820 wider listening (5 weeks):
Explore pieces in genres related to the two set works, which may include:
–         concerti by Vivaldi
–         concerto grosso by Handel
–         piano sonata movements by Haydn and Mozart.
  • In each case relating the music to the set works studied through their use of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language.
  • The works studied here give a background to the set works already studied. The concerto movements give a context for the Bach set work and the piano sonata movements should show a progression in the writing for piano and in the development of sonata form.
Vocal Music set work (2 weeks):
H. Purcell: ‘Music for a While’
  • Explore this piece by using the students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language to make critical judgements about the music.
  • This area of study is diverse but coverage at this stage should reflect Baroque approaches to songwriting, including ground bass structures.
  • Preparation for the performance component is ongoing.
Spring 1
Spring 2
Vocal Music set work (2 weeks):
Queen: ‘Killer Queen’ (from the album Sheer Heart Attack)
  • Explore this piece by using the students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language to make critical judgements about the music. Now both pieces have been studied comparative and evaluative skills can be practised between the two.
  • This area of study is diverse but coverage at this stage should reflect 20th-century popular approaches to songwriting, including ground bass and verse and chorus structures.
Vocal Music wider listening (4 weeks):
Explore other settings of words to music for soloist and accompaniment, which may include:
–         arias by G.F. Handel and J.S. Bach
–         songs by Beach Boys and Alicia Keys
–         if time, songs by Schubert, Faure and/or Britten
  • In each case looking at the relationship of the words and music, and the use of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language.
  • There should be coverage of the full chronological period from 1600s to 1900s, including a range of structures (strophic, through-composed, verse and chorus, da capo aria, etc.) and styles.
Preparation for the performance component is ongoing.
Free composition inspirations and task setting
(1 week):
  • Discuss possible routes into free composition, based on KS3 experiences, and providing examples and guidance towards inspirations.
Thereafter free composition is ongoing.
Music for Stage and Screen set work (2 weeks):
S. Schwartz: ‘Defying Gravity’ (from the album of the cast recording of Wicked)
  • Explore this piece by using the students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language to make critical judgements about the music.
  • The study of this set works should examine popular contemporary musical theatre styles.
Preparation for the performance component is ongoing
Summer 1
Summer 2
Music for Stage and Screen set work (2 weeks):
J. Williams: ‘Main title/rebel blockade runner’ (from the soundtrack to Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope)
  • Explore this piece by using the students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language to make critical judgements about the music. Now that each piece has been studied, comparative and evaluative skills can be practised between the two.
  • The study of this set work should examine composing sound to match pictures.
Music for Stage and Screen wider listening (2 weeks):
  • Explore pieces in genres related to the first set work, which may include:
–         songs from musicals like Matilda and Hairspray.
  • In each case relating the music to the set work studied through their use of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language.
  • The wider listening should enhance the study of contemporary musical theatre.
Free composition and performance is ongoing.
Music for Stage and Screen wider listening (2 weeks):
  • Explore pieces in genres related to the second set work, which may include:
–         excerpts from other film scores by Deborah Lurie and composers like Howard Shore.
  • In each case relating the music to the set works studied through their use of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language.
  • The wider listening should enhance the study of matching music with images undertaken in the set work.
Work on free composition.
Preparation for the performance component is ongoing.
End-of-year examination (1 week).
Year two:
Autumn 1
Autumn 2
Revision of Year One areas of study (4 weeks).
 
Fusions set works (4 weeks):
Afro Celt Sound System: ‘Release’ (from the album Volume 2: Release)
Esperanza Spalding: ‘Samba em Preludio’ (from the album Esperanza)
  • Explore these pieces by using the students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language to make critical judgements about the music. Once each piece has been studied comparative and evaluative skills can be practised between the two.
  • The individual cultures that have been ‘fused’ should be isolated and the resulting fusion evaluated as a work of popular culture.
Preparation for the performance component is ongoing.
Fusions wider listening (4 weeks):
  • Explore pieces in which two or more styles are combined to create a fusion, which should include music from African, Turkish, Afro-Cuban Jazz and Latin traditions.
  • In each case relating the music to the set works studied through their use of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language.
  • The stylistic characteristics of each individual style must be isolated and then the fusion of the styles evaluated for its effectiveness.
Discussion of composition briefs (1 week):
  • Use the guidelines in the specification as a basis for discussion as to how briefs might be tackled.
Thereafter composing to a brief is ongoing.
Preparation for the performance component is ongoing.
Spring 1
Spring 2
Mock exam (1 week).
 
Composing to a brief is ongoing.
 
Preparation for the performance component is ongoing.
Revision of all set works and consolidation of wider listening (4 weeks).
 
Complete composition to a brief.
 
Record performances (2 weeks).
 
Summer 1
Summer 2
Revision of all set works and consolidation of wider listening (5 weeks).
Complete free composition
Performing and Composing submitted for moderation by 15 May (1 week).
Written examination.

 

Key Stage 5

Why Study A Level Music?
A level music allows pupils to become completely autonomous over their performance and compositional output, focusing on disciplines that interest them the most. The course provides a clear and coherent structure that provides a real focus on music. Through the study of the Set Works, a holistic understanding of music is nurtured with a breadth and depth of musical understanding. This leads to continuous progression and is a highly valued skilled set for any progression to High Education or Workplace activities, be that in the sciences, the arts or the vocational.
Features of the Edexcel GCSE Music Course
There are three ways in which this subject is assessed – a 2 hour listening paper on the Set Works we will study and some unfamiliar music, a solo or ensemble recital and a pair of compositions (free and to a set brief). The performances and compositions are examined as coursework and makes up 60% of the marks for the course. The listening paper makes up the remaining 40%.
Enrichment
There is always the opportunity to attend the daily rehearsals within the music department and to take a leading role in the concerts, End of Term Services, trips, and annual musical production. A level pupils are encouraged to lead and organise groups of their own or to direct some of the already established ensembles.
The music rooms are always open for pupils to use to be creative, practise or study.
The musical tour gives pupils the opportunity to experience life as a freelance musician.
As other musical groups tour the country, pupils attend concerts and lectures with them as a way to observe their musical life and styles.
What opportunities for progression does this offer?
Personal autonomy, discipline, problem solving, compromise, creativity, creative thinking, observational skills, ability to study and work independently, organisation, scientific analysis, ability to react and respond to a range of differences. It is also worth mentioning that this qualification is a fine and highly looked upon addition to application for Higher Education or Workplace activities.

 

Scheme of Work: KS5 Course Planner
Year one:
Autumn 1
Autumn 2
Introduction to the course (4 weeks):
  • building on knowledge and experience at GCSE
  • consolidating basic musical vocabulary and knowledge
  • studying exemplar performances and compositions
  • looking at the assessment criteria for the coursework tasks.
 
Free composition, Vocal Music, performance (3 weeks)
 
Free composition inspirations and task setting:
  • discussing possible routes into free composition, based on GCSE experiences
  • providing examples and guidance towards inspirations
  • work on composition commences.
 
Vocal Music:
J.S. Bach, Cantata, Ein feste Burg, BWV 80: Movements 1, 2 and 8
Mozart, The Magic Flute: Act 1 Nos. 4 and 5
  • Explore these pieces by using the students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language to make critical judgements about the music.
  • Once each piece has been studied, comparative and evaluative skills can be practised between the two.
  • This area of study is diverse but coverage at this stage should reflect Baroque and Classical approaches to vocal music.
Preparation for the performance component is ongoing
Vocal Music, free composition, performance (7 weeks):
Vocal Music:
Vaughan Williams, On Wenlock Edge: Nos. 1, 3 and 5
  • Wider listening might include Baroque, Classical and Romantic choral music. Schubert and Fanny Mendelssohn lieder, and extracts from operas by Verdi and Wagner.
  • In each case, look at the relationship of the words and music and the use of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language.
  • There should be coverage of the full chronological period from 1600s to 1900s, including a range of structures and styles.
Work on free composition is ongoing.
 
Preparation for the performance component is
ongoing.

 

Spring 1
Spring 2
Instrumental Music (3 weeks):
Vivaldi, Concerto in D Minor, Op. 3 No. 11
Clara Schumann, Piano Trio in G minor, Op.17: Movement 1
Berlioz, Symphonie Fantastique: Movement 1
  • Explore these pieces by using the students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language to make critical judgements about the music.
  • Once each piece has been studied, comparative and evaluative skills can be practised between the two.
  • This area of study is diverse but coverage at this stage should reflect Baroque and 19th-century approaches to instrumental music.
Free composition is ongoing.
 
Preparatory exercises are started towards composition to a brief assessing technique.
 
Preparation for the performance component is ongoing.
Instrumental Music (3 weeks):
  • Wider listening might include examples of movements from Classical sand Romantic symphonies, chamber music and other instrumental works.
Music for Film (3 weeks):
Bernard Herrmann, Psycho excerpts
Rachel Portman, The Duchess excerpts
  • Explore these pieces by using the students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language to make critical judgements about the music.
  • Once each piece has been studied comparative and evaluative skills can be practised between the two.
  • This area of study is diverse but coverage at this stage should reflect varied approaches to creating mood and atmosphere.
Free composition is ongoing.
 
Preparatory exercises are continued towards composition to a brief assessing technique.
 
Preparation for the performance component is
ongoing.
Summer 1
Summer 2
Music for Film:
Danny Elfman, Batman Returns excerpts
  • Wider listening across a range of film styles should reinforce the study of Music for Film.
Free composition is ongoing.
 
Preparatory exercises are continued towards composition to a brief assessing technique.
 
Preparation for the performance component is ongoing.
Popular Music and Jazz:
The Beatles: selected songs from Revolver
Courtney Pine: selected songs from Back in the Day
Kate Bush: selected songs from Hounds of Love
  • Explore these pieces by using the students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language to make critical judgements about the music.
  • Once each piece has been studied, comparative and evaluative skills can be practised between them.
Free composition is ongoing.
Preparatory exercises are continued towards composition to a brief assessing technique.
Preparation for the performance component is
ongoing.
Year two:
Autumn 1
Autumn 2
Thorough revision of areas of study from Year One
(4 weeks)
 
Popular Music & Jazz (3 weeks):
  • Wider listening should place these pieces within a context of jazz and popular music in the second half of the 20th  and the 21st centuries.
Revise, refine, complete and record free composition.
 
Continue preparatory work towards brief assessing technique.
 
Preparation for the performance component is ongoing.
Fusions:
Debussy, Estampes: Nos. 1 and 2
Anoushka Shankar: Breathing under water selected tracks
Familia Valera Miranda: Caña quema selected songs
  • Explore these pieces by using the students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language to make critical judgements about the music.
  • Once they have been studied, comparative and evaluative skills can be practised between them.
  • Wider listening should build on the GCSE study of fusions among music of different styles.
Continue preparatory work towards brief assessing technique.
Preparation for the performance component is ongoing.

 

Spring 1
Spring 2
New Directions:
Cage, Three Dances for two prepared pianos: No. 1
Stravinsky, The Rite of Spring excerpts
Saariaho, Petals
  • Explore these pieces by using the students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language to make critical judgements about the music.
  • Once each piece has been studied, comparative and evaluative skills can be practised between them.
  • Wider listening should explore pieces in Western music that have attempted new and innovative ideas, or carried such ideas to new extremes or new audiences.
Continue preparatory work towards brief assessing technique.
 
Preparation for the performance component is ongoing.
Thorough revision of all areas of study
 
Continue preparatory work towards brief assessing technique.
 
Preparation for the performance component is
ongoing.

 

Summer 1
Summer 2
Record final performance.
 
Complete and record composition to a brief assessing technique.
 
Revise areas of study.
Examination

 

Extra-curricular music

We aim to encourage a wide variety of music-making opportunities and to develop the musical potential of each pupil by making music an enjoyable and rewarding experience inside and outside the classroom.
Extra-Curricular Timetable
 
Lunch
After-school
Monday
Chamber Choir
Year 9-13
Music Room
Cambiata
Boys only.
Music Room
Tuesday
Theory
All Welcome
IT2
Show Rehearsal
All Welcome
Music Room
Wednesday
Composition
All Welcome
IT2
Show Rehearsal
All Welcome
Music Room
Thursday
School Choir
All Welcome
Music Room
Brass Group
All Welcome
Music Room
Friday
Orchestra
All Welcome
Music Room
Please speak to Mr Roberts if you are interested in any of the above activities.
Please note that the music rooms are available for private rehearsal/practice before, during and after school. You are welcome to take full advantage of this provided you are respectful to the facilities.

Individual Instrumental/Singing Tuition

Instrumental/Singing tuition at Queen Elizabeth Grammar School is able to boast a very accomplished set of specialist teachers who are available for (more or less) all instruments and voice types. In the very unlikely event that a teacher cannot be found at school, a recommendation can be made for you to arrange private lessons.
If you would like to have lessons at school as part of the school day with one of our peripatetic teachers, please fill in the letter given to you in your welcome pack and hand it in to reception. If you do not have this letter to hand, please pick one up from reception.
Alternatively, you can send your request to Mr D Roberts by email:
droberts@qegs.cumbria.sch.uk
Your child will then be given a tutor who will contact you to arrange lessons.
If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the department.